"Nicodemus" is an old soul.


Sea Turtles making a comeback

This Turtle "Nicodemus" is in my new gallery Earth & Sea in Kapaa, Kauai. He is a very old soul. I hand sculpted him from a stone-like epoxy resin clay. I had dozens of photographs of Hawaiian Green Sea Tutles when I was working this winter in Kauai. Went snorkeling and saw many Sea Turtles in the ocean and even saw them from the cliffs above the water. The Hawaiian Green Sea Turtles are making a comeback from when their numbers dwindled and they faced extinction. They are still endangered and have so many challenges to their survival but at least in most countries they are NOT on the menu in restaurants. It seems that there is a great awareness of Sea Turtles especially among children. I was working on one a few months ago in my studio at night and some people walked by on the side walk and I could hear a 3 or 4 year old chatting. As the passed the window the child stopped talking and almost began chanting turtleturtleturtleturtle. It gave me goose bumps or as they say in Hawaii...Chicken Skin!

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"Save the Turtles Save the World"


It is difficult to see in a small image but there are 30 baby turtles here! My inspiration for this piece comes from the amazing survival instinct of the Sea Turtles. Can you imagine they hatch alone with their siblings in the dark of night with only the light of the moon or the stars reflecting off the water to guide them? It can be hundreds of yards to the water and there are many predators on land and many more in the ocean. Some primal force enables any of them to survive. At some level we humans are also at the mercy of nature, with changing weather patterns, global warming and uncertanty. I have had high quality giclees produced of this piece, please inquire about sizes and pricing. I am actively looking for gallery representation.

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Artist works to sculpt, paint and protect Sea Turtles


Artist Linda Hogan with newly completed Green Sea Turtle painted sculpture

Belize is a female Giant Green Sea Turtle. They are abundant in Hawaii and also the Caribbean and Florida. They are still on the endangered species list but people are learning more ways to protect them all the time. A good resource for information about Sea Turtles and what you can do to help is CCC the Caribbean Conservation Corp. founded back in the 50's by Archie Carr.

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"Erosion Kills Sea Turtles"


Sea Turtle nests exposed by storm erosion

In the summer of 2008 tropical storm Fay stalled off the coast of Florida for 7 days, churned the ocean into huge waves and dropped 22 inches of rain. Many low lying housing areas were flooded. The sand was washed away and many of the boardwalks and steps were also washed away or severely damaged. In some areas around Vero Beach the sand dropped off 6 to 8 feet, and extended well up toward the sea grass. Unfortunately about 30% of the Sea Turtle nests were lost. Once the egg chamber is exposed it is quickly attacked by sand crabs, birds or stray dogs. Even the next high tide can wash them away. One of the research people told me that it is rare to be able to save the eggs. She said to incubate them they have to go back into a new egg chamber in the same order and in the same position that they were originally laid. Also if they have been exposed long enough for the temperature to drop that makes their survival very uncertain. It was sad to come upon this scene, but I share it as evidence of the huge obstacles the Sea Turtles face. Very few survive to adulthood.

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"Telluride"


"Telluride"

The little town of Telluride, Colorado is nestled in a deep canyon surrounded by cliffs and mountain peaks. The ski runs keep busy all winter but the summer is spectacular too. We have moved to the southwest part of Colorado, Pagosa Springs, and the San Juan Mountains are so beautiful. I am anxious to get out there with my sketch pad and paints. The mountains are perfect for the three dimensional style because the layer upon layer of the substrate mimics the way it really looks as you gaze out over miles of overlapping terrain.

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"Baba"


Green Sea Turtle "Baba"

This is a half grown young Green Sea Turtle.I am so inspired by these amazing creatures since they have so much to overcome from hatching in the middle of the night with only the light of the moon and stars reflecting off the water to guide them. They immediately become part of the food chain in the ocean and a very small percentage of them ever grow to adulthood. Somehow those females who do survive return to the very beach where they were hatched to lay their eggs! The art is sculpted from wood with the shell very realistly rounded. The paint is acrylic applied in layer after layer to give depth and luminosity to the shell. "Baba" is currently displayed at the Gallery at Bamboo on the north shore of the Big Island.

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"Na Kupuna"


"Na Kupuna"

I fell in love with Sea Turtles from the first time I saw one while on my very first scuba dive. It was an intro dive for newbies wanting to get certified and at about 20 feet down right along the edge of the reef there it was! It seemed so huge and unconcerned just slowly swimming around. It seemed so peaceful and serene I followed it for a while. Amazing. Since then I have studied them and painted them and sculpted them. One of my favorite art pieces is "Na Kupuna" which means the elder in Hawaiian. His face is so expressive and I think he really looks elderly. Turtles can live even longer than humans but there are many predators and dangers for them too. We were living on Molokai for a while and the Turtles were abundant. I am blessed to have my work, both turtles and fish, in three Hawaiian art galleries and three Florida galleries. The Kupuna piece is on Molokai at the Artists Guild Gallery. All of my work can be seen at www.lindahoganart.com

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"Save the Turtles Save the World"


30 baby sea turtles making their way to the ocean

It is difficult to see in a small image but there are 30 baby turtles here! My inspiration for this piece comes from the amazing survival instinct of the Sea Turtles. Can you imagine they hatch alone with their siblings in the dark of night with only the light of the moon or the stars reflecting off the water to guide them? It can be hundreds of yards to the water and there are many predators on land and many more in the ocean. Some primal force enables any of them to survive. At some level we humans are also at the mercy of nature, with changing weather patterns, global warming and uncertanty. I have had high quality giclees produced of this piece, please inquire about sizes and pricing. I am actively looking for gallery representation.

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Save the Reef Save the Turtles


"Save the Reef Save the Turtles"

As a certified scuba diver I have seen the destruction of pristine coral reef in many areas. Not all of it is affected, yet anyway, but I have seen once colorful , healthy coral turned white and lifeless. When that happens, called bleaching, the fish move on to other areas. The reef is home to hundreds of fish and all types of sea turtles. As an artist I wanted to show a really pristine reef with an abundance of life. It's one way I can share my concern and hopefully raise awareness about how fragile the ecosystems are. I have had some of my work made into reproductions and all of my art can be viewed at www.lindahoganart.com

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Sea Turtle Rescue


Rescued Sea Turtle

I came upon a freshly hatched sea turtle nest early one morning in Vero Beach, Fl. There were hundreds of tiny flipper prints leading from the dunes to the water. They looked like small tractor tread imprints on the fine sand. I walked toward the nest to see what it looked like and was shocked to see one little stragler unable to get out and join the others in the water. His back leg was tangled up in the long sea grass and everytime he climbed up he was pulled back down. All the signs posted on the marked nests say it is illegal to touch or interfere with the sea turtles as they are an endangered species. I knew the Sea Turtle Research people would come by as they patrol on ATVs every morning looking for new nests laid in the night as well as any new hatches. I decided to wait and keep watch in case a sand crab, a stray dog, a pelican, or a vulture, tried to harm the turtle. In about a half hour the research person came along and I showed him how the little guy was caught. He carefully dug down and pulled the grass out by the roots and lifted the turtle and grass out then gently untangled him. Fortunately I had my camera and was allowed to snap a picture before the rescuer walked the turtle closer to the water. He put him down about 6 feet from the edge and away he went! It only took about 30 seconds and he was off in the wild blue sea. There are so many predators and other dangers that very few of the thousands of hatchlings reach adulthood, but I like to think "my" little one will beat the odds. Not long after, I was inspired to paint a group of hatchlings on their "maiden voyage". That small painting is on display at the Tropic Art & Frame Gallery in Vero Beach and can also be viewed on my web site www.lindahoganart.com

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